Do you have a burning question about birth control, menstruation, or anything else related to reproductive health? Dr. Sophia Yen, the CEO and co-founder of Pandia Health, is here to answer your inquiries! Pandia is the ONLY practicing reproductive health physician founded and led company in the birth control delivery space led and founded by women!

We offer free delivery of the birth control pill, ring, and patch as well as emergency contraception and accept almost all major insurances! Plus, our blog has tons of resources and information about reproductive health including sex education, STI prevention, and family planning.

Check out the posts below to get more info on any of the above topics; if you’ve got your own question, post it here!

Let’s see what Dr. Yen has to say: Sorry to hear about that. Perhaps you need more Potassium in your diet? Bananas are a good source. Also, if you are not trying to make a baby at this time, you can choose to make your #PeriodsOptional. Watch my TEDxBerkeley talk on the bottom of the link.
Dr. Yen advises:
#1 the doctor gets no “pleasure” out of seeing your private parts, it’s their job and they see lots of them all day, every day.
#2 your primary care provider could probably do your pap and STIs. you may never need to see a gynecologist UNLESS you are pregnant and need their obstetrics.
#3 the speculum and pelvic exams are uncomfortable, but if you have someone who is experienced, it can be less uncomfortable and it can be QUICK! So, I’d choose someone who has done A LOT of pap smears, speculum exams, and who does a LOT every day; so maybe gynecologist over internal medicine etc.
Maybe the true question is: What’s my first speculum exam going to be like? Check out this info from Planned Parenthood.

Dr. Yen says: Assuming the test you are asking about is pregnancy test: if it has been 14 days from the time you had unprotected sex, then you can do a test and if it is negative, you can be reasonably sure you are NOT pregnant.
Dr. Yen’s comment: When it stops, it stops. If the spotting is bothering you, you can try adding 600 mg of ibuprofen WITH food for up to 3 times a day for up to 5 days and that decreases the spotting.
Here’s what Dr. Yen says: Not that I am aware of. I am NOT an ob/gyn. Progesterone is given sometimes to prevent recurrent miscarriages but that is AFTER one is pregnant. If you give too much progesterone then that will PREVENT pregnancy.
Dr. Yen says: Go to the ER or urgent care and get checked out. Swollen ankles is NOT good. You need a pregnancy test and it might have to be one done by blood versus urine. Blood picks it up faster than urine. Wishing you a good outcome.
According to Dr. Yen:
1. Different people feel things at different thresholds. Sounds like you don’t notice blood until it is too late
2. Sounds like a LOT of blood. If that is the case, see your provider and get checked for Von Willebrand’s Disease (the MOST common blood disorder and is usually picked up by soaked pants from periods)
3. Consider getting on the birth control pill, patch, ring, They make your periods predictable. and you can also #SkipPeriods using those methods.
Here’s Dr. Yen’s explanation: Each person with a uterus is different. But generally it is thought that progesterone causes weight gain from “munchies” and activating aldosterone = “water retention.” Progesterone begins to be released at ovulation and peaks 7 days after that which is 7 days BEFORE you get your bleed/period. There are 8 different progesterones that can be in the birth control pill. So if 1 doesn’t work for you, you can try another. Check out this article and the diagram below for when progesterone peaks.

Be sure to check out Dr. Yen on Quora and feel free to submit any question you have about Pandia or reproductive health! If you’re interested in getting your birth control delivered for FREE, sign up today! Thank you for supporting the ONLY women founded and led, doctor led company in the birth control delivery space 🙂 #PandiaPeaceofMind

The above information is for general informational purposes only and is NOT a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your doctor/primary care provider before starting or changing treatment.